4/5/16

AtoZ Letter D...Doing Dishes

Do you remember Old Fashion Quaker Oats?  How about Duz Soap?  Both went into my mother's shopping cart back in the days when dishes and glassware were the prizes for buying those products.  To this day, oatmeal is my favorite breakfast food, and I owe it all to the dishes packed in Quaker Oats.  It began a lifetime of collecting Dishes, Glassware, Crystal, Pottery, Silverware, Tablecloths, Napkins and on and on.

Of all the dishes that have come and gone through my cupboards, hutches, cabinets and collections the Early American Prescut are the stars.  The 'Star of David Pattern' is perhaps one of the most collected patterns of prescut patterns with it's easily recognized 'Star of David' centerpiece.

EAPC was made by Anchor Hocking Glass Company from 1960 through 1999.  This pattern is designated as the 700 Line in Anchor Hockings catalogs with every piece having the star except for the Double Candle Holder which has a center knob, and the punch cup.  Punch cups and saucers along with small berry bowls and juice glasses were some of the first EAPC's packed in oatmeal and therefore officially known as 'Oatmeal'.  Several sizes of prescut/oatmeal juice glasses were packed with jelly, making them cupboard collectibles.
As with most mass produced pressed glass, the market became saturated and this glassware was cheap or free as in the case of oatmeal, jelly and gasoline.  The 'Punch Bowl Set' was a promotional give-a-way with Texaco Gasoline Stations during the 1960's.   No wonder so many of us Sixties Brides received the 11 piece Table Service as wedding gifts.  My Mother-In-Law must have cashed in a years worth of coveted Green Stamps for the set that started my collection. 

Fifty years later, I have completed my collection with the rarest pieces made in the EAPC 700 Line.
Oil Lamp, Double Candle Holders, Eight Paneled Bowl....(bottom tier),
 Square Pitcher...(above photo), Deviled Egg Plate...(above photo),
Lazy Susan with rack, Snack Plates, and several small plates and bowls. 
The Rarest Piece made was a 5 inch Rosebud Vase...it is in the Anchor Hocking EAPC Museum.  Most of my collection of EAPC is from Thrift Stores, Junktique Shops, Flea Markets and Garage Sales...the hunt is part of the thrill of collecting. 
 
My one Oil Lamp I bought on eBay and was the most money I ever paid for any piece, and yet my most precious and prized pieces were bought with Green Stamps. 
Who knew a 'Butter Dish' would one day be priceless!

15 comments:

  1. I knew about some things being in oatmeal. This is very interesting thank you for sharing. A friend of mine and I have been getting it from thrifts shops for my booth and after reading this I am so happy some of it is not selling.
    Hugs
    donna

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    1. Thrift shop prices are usually pretty low for EAPC...especially the more common pieces. Resale value in booths etc., are also fairly low except for the more rare pieces. The longer it is around and survives the more it will increase in value.

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  2. Wow - very impressive......alas, we just had the old Corelware. My Dad is still using it. Indestructible.

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    1. It is indestructible and still being made today. It's got staying power.

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  3. I LOVE this. My grandmother had several glasses and bowls from her Quaker Oats. I never knew gas stations to give away punch bowls. Imagine that! It seems like the unlikeliest of scenarios given that gas stations used to be SERVICE stations where you could actually get your car worked on by a tough guy in overalls. I doubt he knocked back a cup of punch at the end of the day.

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    1. So funny...tough guys at the punch bowl! What better place to spike the punch and put a Tiger in your Tank!

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  4. Pinned that first image to my 2016 Blogging from AtoZ Pinterest Board.
    Those state-themed plates are all the rage now - displaying them as a collection on the wall.
    www.thriftshopcommando.blogspot.com (No. 112 on the list)

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    1. Oh Wow...thanks for the PIN. I see State Plates making a comeback, too. My favorites in that group of plates is the Ma and Pa Plates made by Vacation Bible Schoolers.

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  5. I used to take these dishes for granted while growing up, isn't it amazing how valuable they are now?!

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    1. Who knew they would someday be quite collectible and so useful, too.

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  6. I grew up on oatmeal every morning - and my parents still eat it every day. I had forgotten all about Duz soap until I read the name in your post - that took me back!

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    1. Oatmeal and toast with plum jelly...mmmmm! There were several household products that had a give-a-ways. Dishtowels were in soap, too...I think!

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  7. I have a few of those pieces (not the rare stuff). I used to love going 'shopping' in the S&H Green Stamps store/catalogue.

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  8. My family had the man and woman style plates on our wall! My two older sisters carried on the tradition when they got married as well. I have mine but did not get the rest of the family done, maybe because the store where we bought them went out of business? Being the crafter I am, I probably could copy a set from my sister and make my own! Great post!

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  9. Oh, the memories. My mother used to get sheets with Green Stamps. We had Plaid Stamps in New York, too. Duz soap! And I didn't know anything about the Star of David pattern. Oh please don't make me clutter my house up even more...Alana ramblinwitham.blogspot.com

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