7/22/13

Oil Boom Back...21st Century Style

Oil and Gas Industry in Pecos County
Located in the Petroleum rich Permian Basin, Pecos is one of the most prolific Oil and Gas Producing Counties in Texas.  The petroleum business here began about 1900 with the drilling of the Turney Well near an ancient 'seep', a traditional local source of oil for lubricating and medicinal purposes.
 
A short lived BOOM in 1921 caused by the discovery of the 'Miracle Well' heralded the arrival of the fabulous Yates Oil Field 1926, indicating the area's great potential oil wealth.  Since that year over 710 million barrels of oil have been produced from the Yates, Fort Stockton and other county fields.
 
The presence of Natural Gas, known for years, was slow to be exploited because gas was considered an undesirable By-Product of the oil business.  The first commercial use of gas here was inspired after it was found by workers drilling a water well, in 1925.  The discovery, about 1948, of Santa Rosa Field spurred exploration that brought in the Puckett Field in 1952.  Subsequent deep drilling tapped many extensive pools, including in 1963 the prolific Gomez Field, which had produced over 478 billion cubic feet of gas as of 1970.  Today petroleum is the single most important economic asset of Pecos County.  Texas Historical Marker 1973
 
Yes, the Oil Boom is Back in West Texas and in my home towns.  It's come a long way since the discovery of that 'undesirable by product' back in 1926.  In the last 87 years technology and the demand of oil and gas world wide has brought the OIL BOOM back to Texas...Twenty-first Century Style with...
  Clipboards and Walkie Talkies to Laptops and Cell phones. 
Tent Towns to Trailer Towns
They say it's 'Here to Stay'... for how long 'They Cannot Say'!
Ah, History....you will 'Repeat One Day'...with
BOOM to BUST!
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9 comments:

  1. smells like progress, like a gardeners sniff of black gold soil.
    Ahhh, life is good as God

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  2. I'm thankful that Texas is still pumping "black gold" by using pretty blue equipment. Thanks for sharing.

    Happy Blue Monday, Sue.

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  3. My Dad worked as an oilfield equipment mechanic in Coleman County in the 50's and 60's. I remember everything smelling like oil all the time.

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  4. It is amazing to see all the activity when I drive to see my mom. Great post, Sue!

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  5. We have no oil around her, but they are plenty of gas well. I finally got one small check after several years. Never be like the oils wells of another time.

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  6. I remember the small pumps from my years in L.A. They always reminded me of some sort of strange animal dipping its head for a drink over and over. And they were green. Not like these.

    Odd memory.

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  7. I would sure like to own a couple of those blue pumps! Lol! These was a clever post. Always fun to see you here and listen to you tell a story! Have a good week! Hugs Anne

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  8. "Undesirable by-product" - HA!

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  9. Hi Sue ... technology caught up in Texas .. this little country has a few challenges with a new oil boom - but we need the gas!

    Interesting to see and read .. cheers Hilary

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