11/10/10

H is for Horn...Of Plenty

AKA 'Cornucopica'...a symbol of  food and abundance


In Greek mythology, Amalthea was a goat who raised Zeus on her breast milk, in a cave, on Mount Ida of Crete. Her horn was accidentally broken off by Zeus while playing together. The god Zeus, in remorse, gave her back her horn with supernatural powers, which would give whoever possessed it whatever they wished for. The original depictions were of the goat's horn filled with fruits and flowers: deities, especially Fortuna, were depicted with the horn of plenty.

 The cornucopia was also a symbol for a woman's fertility. The story is said to be a predecessor of the Unicorn and the Holy Grail stories.

In modern depictions, the cornucopia is typically a hollow, horn-shaped wicker basket filled with various kinds of festive fruit and vegetables. In North America, the cornucopia has come to be associated with Thanksgiving and the harvest.

There, I have fulfilled my Alphabe~Thursday Lesson on the known history of the Horn of Plenty and it's association with Thanksgiving.

So, are Ya'll ready for the TEXAS version?

While the rest of America has accepted the Pilgrims and Plymouth Rock as the original Thanksgiving celebrants, certain Texas historians have long maintained that the first Thanksgiving took place, not at Plymouth Rock, but in Palo Duro Canyon.
 
Yep, Thanksgiving takes on a whole new Texas perspective with Palo Duro Canyon instead of Plymouth Rock, and the Texas Indians eating buffalo instead of turkey every year. If you think leftover turkey is hard to finish, leftover buffalo could last families until the next Thanksgiving .

Spanish explorer, Francisco Vasquez de Coronado was the noted participant of that first Thanksgiving, Texas-style, and it can be argued that Coronado had more to be thankful for than the Pilgrims. Coronado's expedition had left Mexico in search of the Seven Cities of Cibola, but instead of a mythical city of gold, Coronado and his men found the Llano Estacado, where there were no cities, no trees and very little water.


Ya'll can imagine just how thankful Coronado and his men must have been to leave behind those miles and miles of nothing but miles and miles, and how downright ecstatic he must have been to find Palo Duro Canyon and the friendly Teyas Indians who lived there.

Coronado's records show that he celebrated Thanksgiving with the Indians on Ascension Thursday, May 23, 1541. Friar Juan de Padilla performed a Thanksgiving Mass witnessed by the Indians.

Some 300 years later, in 1848, not long after Texas had become a state, Gov. George T. Wood established the first Texas State Thanksgiving. Texas was the first state in the South to call for a day of Thanksgiving.

Coronado might have termed his expedition a failure, but he succeeded in giving Texas (which wouldn't be a state for three more centuries) something to add to its list of bragging rights -- the country's first Thanksgiving....

.....and this Girl Raised In Texas a chance to show off my Horn of Plenty!
Now, I know that sounds like a bunch of Texas Horn Tootin', but I swear Ya'll, I Did Not make that up.  If you don't believe me,  just ask any Texan!  Or verify my story HERE.

In fact, ask Jenny, I'm bettin' she's run across this same story in her research for some of her stories. 

Just Click HERE to ask Jenny and while you are there be sure and check out Everyone's Letter H Posts! 

36 comments:

  1. You've done it again. Filled us with absolutely the most fascinating trivia we never expected to know about. And your collection is gorgeous! Have a happy day, XXMollye

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  2. Love this Sue, A real history lesson and it is fun too. The platter is a winner no matter what the origin. I have a beautiful ceramic Horn of Plenty but I don't know where it is hiding. HA! I must start hunting when I have time. That would not be today.
    Hugs, Jeanne

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  3. Oops, the platter comment is in ref. to your prev. post. I bet you knew that. HA!
    Jeanne, again!!!

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  4. Dear Son and I are reading "The Lightening Thief" (Percy Jackson series) together right now, and it leaves me wishing I could brush up on my Greek Mythology!.. So funny now reading Zeus was raised by a goat?!!! I didn't remember THAT, back in my school days! That's gotta leave its mark on a child, don'tcha think?!! Guess he must have loved her PLENTY, though, to give her a horn full of anything she wished for!!! ~tina

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  5. Great post! I learn more and more about Texas when I read your posts, lol.

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  6. Interesting Texas facts that you provide us. Is there anything that Texas didn't do "first" or "better"? (Just kidding) I do love to read your Texas posts. The Horn of Plenty is beautiful.

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  7. I love it...but of course I'm a texas gal...

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  8. That sounds like some Texas Longhorning there but I believe you. Does that mean we get to celebrate that big meal twice this year?

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  9. First let me say that I LOVE visiting Palo Duro Canyon!!

    Now, I want to thank you for the great lesson about the horn of plenty. Brava!

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  10. I would not dream of commenting on a dispute between states! I did enjoy your story though :)

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  11. I always learn something new on Alphab-Thursdays! Fun history lesson~ I have to say I'm thankful the pilgrims didn't eat buffalo :-)

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  12. Sue,

    Neat post!
    Pilgrim Carol!!!

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  13. I've always thought the horn of plenty was interesting and borderline funny - kinda like gourds!

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  14. Your horn of plenty is certainly festive looking! I love the Texas version of the first Thanksgiving. Now, how do I drop that story into some general conversation? LOL

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  15. buffalo instead of turkey? I'm not quite thrill of eating turkey so buffalo is definitely out for me

    interesting alphabe-thursday

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  16. That was very interesting. Why shouldn't it be an authentic version of events? It's a big country, and surely the pilgrims weren't the only ones to be thankful!

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  17. Never heard of Palo Duro Canyon or the Texas version (of course they have to have one :)! Fun post. Joni

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  18. The horn of plenty is such a great choice for the letter H -- kudos to you! :)

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  19. Oh, I forgot to mention that I will always remember the magical moment I saw wild turkeys in Palo Duro Canyon!

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  20. Great "H" post! I've always wondered why the horn of plenty was associated with Thanksgiving. Such a fun post! I also never knew that Texas had it's own version of Thanksgiving! Very fascinating story :)

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  21. Awesome post! The Texan version is the best!
    Thanks for sharing!
    HAPPY H Day!
    Coralie

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  22. You horn of plenty is beautiful. It was so interesting to read about the first Thanksgiving.

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  23. This reminds me of my childhood so much. My mom's oldest sister made a cornucopia in a ceramics class and it was around for decades. It represents Thanksgiving dinner to me.

    Thanks for sharing!

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  24. I am your newest follower from Jenny Matlock. My middle name is Helper. Please follow me as well. Thank you.

    The Disconnected Writer
    http://thedisconnectedwriter.blogspot.com/

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  25. Hi Sue--your Texas Thanksgiving story is fascinating!! Now I'll think of it everytime I look at my thanksgiving pilgrim decor!! And I love horns of plenty. I did not know about Zeus' connection! I feel that I have learned so much today, and seen some gorgeous pieces at the same time. I'm your newest follower so I won't miss out on more! Linda

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  26. As a former Texas girl, coming from a line of Texans that goes back to the Republic, I'm embarrassed to say I did not know all this!

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  27. Thank you for sharing all the fun facts!

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  28. I believe you!

    Happy early Thanksgiving!

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  29. Enjoyed the Texas version and your lovely photos! Happy H Day!

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  30. Texas! Arizona! I'm staying out of it - ha!

    But I have to say, I loved the story and especially adore your collection. You have the neatest stuff there girl.

    I need to head out that way if you're ever having a big garage sale!

    Thanks for the fascinating and happy stop on our little journey through Alphabe-Thursday's letter "H".

    A+

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  31. haahhhahaha....gotta know I love this.
    I live less than 2 hours from Palo Duro...in fact, going right by it on my way to Amarillo in the morning. :))
    Great post, sister friend.
    xo bj

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  32. Beautiful horn of plenty and a great history lesson!

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  33. I always wondered why a cornucopia was the shape of a horn when I saw one. Now I don't have to look it up, thank you very much. First time I've ever heard of the Coronado's thanksgiving story, too. I'm glad you stopped by my blog earlier. I may have missed all this wealth of stuff to know. :-)

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  34. I'm a history nut, and this was a great post! I'd never heard that story, but I totally believe you. Thanks for sharing it, and the great pictures.

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  35. Thanks for the lesson...and the humor! Thanks also for the comments on my H post...have a wonderful weekend! ps No WAy you are over 60...

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  36. I'm guessing that Texas has a fabulous history ... this was so interesting to read about!

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