2/4/16

Violet Surviors

What flower do you associate with February?   Roses?  Red Roses, right?  A bouquet of a dozen red roses this time of the year...first couple of weeks of February, anyway...keeps floral shops and other Sweetheart gift providers, hopping. 

What about February's Flower of the Month...the Violet? 

Typically, not thought of as a February flower or as a bouquet gift unless the sweetheart's name is Violet or Viola...or...the recipient is an avid 'Saintpaulia' grower/collector/fan. 

Saintpaulia is the botanical name for African Violets, and yes, I have had a collection of them, and no, I was never a member of the African Violet Society of America....but my Aunt Bea was.

Bea was my African Violet mentor and inspiration to be an African Violet enthusiast.  At first I was content with the five or so plants she gave me to start my own violet collection/hobby.  Then, as they began to bloom with a plethora of 'Blooming Must Haves', my hobby turned into yet another 'OverDoSue' life changing event.

Before I knew it, shelves of violets took over every appropriately sun lite window, and when that space was over run, out came UV Grower Bulbs to hang over more shelves.  I read and collected books on How To Grow Violets, bought Violet Pots, Violet Potting Soil, Violet Food, and of course more Violets...usually ones that were on their last living leaf and bloom.  After Easter is a good time to find bargain violets.

Like many of my life changing events/collections the 'Living Violets' eventually bit the dust as we say here in Texas.  After several moves to not so violet friendly places, the only survivors were a mixed media painting and a McCoy Pitcher.

Aunt Bea and her violets have also been the inspiration for several posts here on CollectInTexas Gal.
The Vast Violet Veranda
The Letter V...AtoZ 2014

10 comments:

  1. Both of my Grandmothers had African Violets growing on their window sills in McCoy vases. I have tried but to no luck!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. McCoy made some of the earliest pots for African violets. I had several, and like your grandmother, they did well on the window sill.

      Delete
  2. Those were the only plants my mother could grow. She (and I) have brown thumbs. Mom would pretty much ignore them, and they would thrive, much to the chagrin of her African Violet growing friend (UV lights, special feed, etc) I could do the same with my roses in San Angelo.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The African Violet gods must have been watching over your Mother's plants. No other way to explain it.

      Delete
  3. Oh yes, I've also done the African Violet thing. I finally let them bite the dust. I over mothered them until they made me nervous. I've always loved the kind of violets pictured on the little pitcher.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's a good word to describe those who care for those persnickety violets...nervous. I am partial to the tiny purple blooms, too.

      Delete
  4. I like violets more than roses. Lovely pictures - the purples are so rich.

    ReplyDelete
  5. That's funny that HiHoney had to make a comment about the overflowing of African violets. I don't have places for them, or I might overdo, too!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Stop in from Alamma blog. I've done so so with African violets. But notice some people have crocus poking though.
    A sure sign spring is on the way.
    Coffee is on

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi Sue - I have actually managed to keep some Africa Violets alive in recent years (two I believe!) .. but I love seeing the wild violets in the hedgerows ... and then the sugared violets ... my father used to bring those and sugared rosepetals back from London .. they were delicious for a brief time - til the sugar set in!! Cheers Hilary

    ReplyDelete

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails