12/5/13

Crochet 'Cup Cozy Doily Maker' Award

Like many things, Crochet has 'Come and Gone' over the years.  It's origin is vague with many theories and discoveries of ancient crochet examples and references in writings from Switzerland to South America. 

Crochet was properly introduced to Needleworkers during the 19th Century with the industrialization of 'Machine Spun Cotton Thread'.  Thank-you Eli Whitney! 

I personally have my high school Homemaking I teacher, Mrs. Browning, to thank for learning crochet.  It was another of those 'BackInThe Sixties' thingies that every young girl should know in order to make coffee table doilies and spider web bedspreads...the essential and ultimate stamp to being inducted into the realm of a 'Master Hooker'.

By the time I got to Homemaking IV, my 'Hope Chest' held a collection of what Mrs. Browning finally gave up and gave me the best 'Cup Cozy Doily Maker' award.  Needless to say, I did not invest in the 100 Balls of 100 percent cotton thread it took to make a bedspread. 

The final blow to my lack of 'Crochet Curriculum Mastery' was knowing my fellow 'Hookers' had outdone me with their Hope Chests overflowing with crochet doilies, tablecloths and bedspreads...the 1960's Susie Homemaker's Guide to Hooking a Husband.  My only consolation was my Hope Chest full of 'Aprons'...I could SEW and COOK. 

I never did make a crocheted bedspread or master the art of 'Coffee Table Doilies'. However, I am a 'Master Doily Collector' as well as crocheted lace and crochet books.   Never one to give up on learning a 'Needlework' skill, I gave Mrs. Browning's lessons a second chance and made these....
 Thanks Mrs. Browning for the 'Cup Cozy Doily Maker' Award.  Your 'Positive Reinforcement'
made all the difference in a
Lifetime of Crochet Enjoyment for this Susie Homemaker.
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18 comments:

  1. Oh I live your little doily sachet thingys. Cute.

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  2. A hope chest, I wonder if anyone has them anymore? We dreamed of being homemakers!

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  3. I would sure love to have a look at that 1947 crochet book. I like old doily patterns. They are the best. I think you have it pretty well covered if you can cook and sew. That's a LOT by today's standards. Your pillows are very pretty.

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  4. Love your style of using crochet ~ glad you are doing what you love to do ~ Great post for C ~ carol, xxx

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  5. The first thing I crocheted was a doily -- I still have it, mistakes and all! Now I enjoy making toys with cotton and an F or G hook! It's rare that I pick up a steel crochet hook and cotton thread! (I do have a crocheted bedspread -- but not made by me!!)
    Your heart sachets are beautiful -- I can't imagine what it takes to get all those tucks smooth and perfect!

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  6. so many pretty things. I never learned how to crochet, and I'm so uncoordinated now that I think nothing would come out right... {:-D

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  7. I haven't crocheted for years, but at one time I was a mad crochet-er! I made a christening gown and coat for my nephew's christening and a queen-sized bedspread. Now I look at the old patterns and wonder 'how did I do that?'

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  8. There was a time that I made those bedspreads and doilies, but now I only knit:) The doily sachets are very pretty:)

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  9. Not a crocheter (or a hooker HA HA), but I own quite a few that have been passed down to me. I have also bought some in antique stores. I use them primarily in bedrooms.

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  10. Sue, these are gorgeous. You can go ahead and laugh while remembering my extreme lack of any type of needle craft prowess. My teacher must have been so glad to see me finish the year.

    I hope to see you sharing your holiday posts with us for Pink Saturday.♥

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  11. It goes to show that it's never too late to learn! Great job!

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  12. Your hope chest/bedspread description made me chuckle -- I'm of that era also :)

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  13. One of my girlfriends taught me how to knit and crochet. I made baby blankets, booties and sweaters and caps for my children, then not again until I did blankets and booties for grandchildren.

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  14. Hi Sue! Wow! You are an expert needlewoman! You deserve many honors, trophies, and props for your handiwork!

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  15. Beautiful crochets! My grandma used to do that, and passed it along to my mom. It's the one part of sewing/crafting/needlepoint that I did not learn.

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  16. Your crocheting is lovely. Mine, er, not so great. I crocheted a blanket for Natalie because Sophia liked the one someone had given to her. The woman had moved and lost touch. So, Grammy volunteered. Borrowed a pattern from neighbor. Decided it looked small so I made it bigger. OMG it took forever. I bought more yarn. I kept crocheting. Eventually it was done and gifted. Hum, didn't see it when I was just up there this weekend! I was sticking to the no crocheting rule except, just today, as I was looking at blogs I saw a cute little crocheted beanie. Hum, no, no, no! Finish some of the other projects currently in the works!

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  17. Your second chance items are wonderful! I have crocheted in my life, but not much and not well. I can knit much better.

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  18. Crocheting is a skill I never mastered...

    But I am a good cook and I am a rather efficient cleaner too!

    Clever post for the letter "C".

    Thanks for linking.

    A+

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