3/31/12

Welcome Spring ~ Inside the Iris

Beautiful Iris flower,
Some petals folded down,
Instead
Many are upright, however,
Making a pretty crown
Indeed!
Tantalising architecture,
Fragrence in profound,
Appealed!
Nectar lover pollinators,
Straying all around,
Hurried!
Jyoti Sunit Chaudhary

Scrappin' It Out ~ Quilting Fabrics of the 1940's

Collectin' The 1940's

I've been a 'Scrap Lover' for as long as I can remember.
  I learned to sew sitting beside my Mother, the 'Queen of Scraps'.
The 'Make Do and Mend' motto of the 1940's WWII era had a huge influence on the fabrics of the 1940's.

With the occupation of France, the fashion industry saw drastic changes, and the 'Limitation of Supplies Order' which meant that the amount of cloth used in an 'Item of Clothing' was regulated. The shortage of fabric during the war shaped the slim silhouette styles we now associate with the 40's.
For an insight into the 'Home Seamstresses' fashion check out Sew Craftful's post 'Everything Old is New Again:  Patriotic Zero-Waste Fabrics of the 1940's.
Over the years, I have collected Vintage Quilt Tops and practiced the 'Mend and Make Do' motto of the 1940's by mending and cutting the quilt tops into 12" squares, combining them with muslin, adding reproduction era appropriate fabric for borders and LongArm Machine quilting them.  The quilt shown here is a wonderful example of the fabrics of the 1940's.  For an informative overview of Vintage Fabrics starting with the 1920's through the 1970's...check out  Newtonia Battlefield Quilters post Vintage Fabric.

3/30/12

'SMILE'...You're In A 1940's Photo Booth

The Photo Vending Machine has been around for awhile.
The modern photo booth appeared on Broadway in  New York City in 1925,
and for 25 cents, the booth took, developed and printed 8 photos in about ten minutes.
In the first six months, 280,000 people sat on the stool, drew the curtains and posed.
The Photomation Company was created to place booths nationwide.
In 1940, my Grandmother Minnie....that's her in the top left photo, must have loaded up the kids and some of their friends for a trip to Town.  It would have been an all day affair and really big deal...as they lived on a farm several miles out of Adair, Iowa.  That's my Uncle Eugene in the top right photo....he was sixteen. 
I get a kick out of this Photo Booth picture of my Uncle Leon. 
He went to Town in his everyday overalls, and decided while he was there to buy a new hat.
So why not get my picture taken!
In comparison, another relative got all dressed up for his 'Mug Shot' in his stylish 1940's hat.
These Photo Booth pictures are from my Mother's 1940 Years Album.
My favorites are these of Mom and her BFF...Best Friend Forever.
They came to Texas together in about 1945.
I'm sure glad they did....Mom met a Texas Sailor.


'SMILE'...You're In A 1940's Photo Booth written in support of the
1940 US Census Community Project
Upon it's release, the 1940 Census Community Project, a joint initiative between Archives.com, Family Search, findmypast.com and other leading genealogy organizations, will coordinate efforts to provide quick access to these digital images and immediately start indexing these records to make them searchable online with free and open access.
You, too, can support the 1940 US Census Community Project
by volunteering as a 1940 US Census Indexer.
the1940census.com
Click on Badge and Get Started Today!


3/29/12

Collectin' The 1940's....Glamour Girl Head Vases

Elizabeth Ruth 'Betty' Grable
December 18, 1916 - July 2, 1973
I'm sure you recognize Betty from her photo,
but would you recognize her as the model for a popular 'Floral Head Vase'? 
Betty was an American actress, dancer, singer and the Number One Pin-Up Girl of the World War II era.  She began her Hollywood career in the early 1930's and rose to stardom in the early 1940's in A Yank In The RAF, a World War II film that was her first serious leading role in a major Hollywood film.
Lady Head Vases, originally a container for floral arrangements, have become a popular Collectable.  Vases in the shape of beautiful and famous women had their beginning in the 1940's and were produced through the 1950's, 1960's and 1970's. 

My 1940 Head Vase Collection consists of these two Glamour Girl Vases modeled after Betty Grable.  The rest of my Collection is from the 1950's and 1960's....here are a few of those.
And now for more on the model for the 1940 Glamour Girl Head Vase...Betty Grable. 
Elizabeth Ruth Grable was born to John Conn Grable and Lillian Rose Hofmann in
 Saint Louis, Missouri, and was the youngest of three children.

I'm looking forward to finding out the Where's and What's about Betty Grable
 in the soon to be released 1940 US Census.  
The 1940 Census will be her Third appearance in the Census Records. 
 Wouldn't it have been fun to be 'The Census Taker of the Stars'?


Collectin' The 1940's...Glamour Girl Head Vases written in support of the
1940 US Census Community Project
Upon it's release, the 1940 Census Community Project, a joint initiative between Archives.com, Family Search, findmypast.com and other leading genealogy organizations, will coordinate efforts to provide quick access to these digital images and immediately start indexing these records to make them searchable online with free and open access.
You, too, can support the 1940 US Census Community Project
by volunteering as a 1940 US Census Indexer.
the1940census.com
Click on Badge and Get Started Today!

Linking To

3/27/12

Tuesday Tip...1940 Indexing...Texas Lingo

Howdy Ya'll,
I'm here to tell you that knowing 'Local Yokel Lingo' can make a big difference in your Indexing of the 1940 US Census experience and your  'Arbitration Results'.

Arbitration Results!!!  What's that? 

I can best answer by revealing my own experience as an Indexer for the 1940 US Census.....

From the list of 'Download Batch', my first choice is anything from Texas. I started with Birth Records and right away knew that having a background in Texas Geography and Surname Lingo was going to be helpful in deciphering not only the 'Recorder's handwriting' but also the Spelling.  You see, in Texas...Counties, Cities, Towns and Places can really be called 'PoDunk'.

Here's a few Texas Places that will give you an idea of...'Can that be right'?
Hogeye, Notrees, Telegraph,  and Telephone, Texas
Kickapoo, Bigfoot, Frognot, Ding Dong, and Dime Box, Texas
Twitty, Kermit, Elmo, Nemo and Sylvester, Texas
Venus and Mars, Texas
Winters and Blanket, Texas
How about another Country in Texas.
China, Dublin, Egypt, Italy, Ireland, Turkey, London, Paris and Palestine, Texas
How about something to eat?
Bacon, Noodle, Oatmeal, Turkey, Trout, Sugar Land, Salty, Rice, Pearland and Orange, Texas
and for sure have a drink of Sweetwater, Texas.
Surnames...well, Ya'll, let's just say that Spanish, German and Southern Dialects have been Texanized over the years and 'Phonics' ...that is spellin' it like it sounds...ain't necessarily the way it is!  And Penmanship?  I'll have to get around to that in another post.

 I marched right through Birth Indexing and on to Death Certificate Indexing...which took me awhile longer due to a few more lines in the form, but mostly because they were very interesting with the longevity or short lived lives, and the causes of death.  Then I did several Batches of Texas Marriage Certificates without a hitch...pun intended...meaning the Arbitrators agreed 100 percent with my Indexing.  I've always liked 100's. 

I blew my 100 percent 'Arbitration Results'!
I thought I could  Speak and Spell Pennsylvanian!
The Longhorn and Short of this Tuesday Tip...
'The Grass Grazing is not always Greener in Pennsylvania'
Tuesday Tip...1940 Indexing...Texas Lingo written in support of the
1940 US Census Community Project

Upon it's release, the 1940 Census Community Project, a joint initiative between Archives.com, Family Search, findmypast.com and other leading genealogy organizations, will coordinate efforts to provide quick access to these digital images and immediately start indexing these records to make them searchable online with free and open access.
You, too, can support the 1940 US Census Community Project
by volunteering as a 1940 US Census Indexer.
the1940census.com
Click on Badge and Get Started Today!

3/26/12

Indexing Gordon Bladderpod In Texas

What does Gordon Bladderpod and the US Census have in common?

It occurrs 'Once a Decade'!

Thanks to the Winter Rains in drought stricken Texas, Gordon Bladderpod is right now covering  the pastures, rolling hills, and road ways in a beautiful blanket of Toxic Yellow Blooms and Pods.

The plant...yes, it's a plant...not a person...which appears in West Texas is Toxic to horses when consumed in large quantities.  It can lead to a high temperature and swelling in the animals lower body...ie..it's reference to 'bladder'.

The native to West Texas Annual is identified and Indexed in Agricultural terms as Lesquerella gordonii, a multistemmed forb with bright yellow blooms and adjoining pods.
Typically Gordon Bladderpod isn't a threat to livestock because animals have other plants to graze, but drought conditions have stressed pasture grasses and plants.  The yellow blooms will fade to a reddish color as it matures.  The hollow seed pods are key to identifying it from other non-toxic yellow spring wildflowers.
"When grazin' times are tough....the Tough get Tougher. 
Why, I can eat my weight in that lil O yellow flower. 
My mama didn't name me 'Sweet Pee' for nothin'.
BTW, my ancestors were Indexed in the 1860 US Census".

According to the 1860 US Census, there were 600,000 people and 4 million head of cattle in Texas.
  Most of the Longhorn cattle lived between the Rio Grande and Nueces Rivers.
Indexing Gordon Bladderpod in Texas written in support of the
1940 US Census Community Project

Upon it's release, the 1940 Census Community Project, a joint initiative between Archives.com, Family Search, findmypast.com and other leading genealogy organizations, will coordinate efforts to provide quick access to these digital images and immediately start indexing these records to make them searchable online with free and open access.
You, too, can support the 1940 US Census Community Project
by volunteering as a 1940 US Census Indexer.
the1940census.com
Click on Badge and Get Started Today!

3/24/12

1941 Desert Rose by Franciscan Pottery

Collectin' The 1940's

In 1940 and 1941, Gladding, McBean & Company introduced a line of dinnerware sold as Franciscan Pottery.  The raised relief handpainted patterns were hugely popular and remain so today as the highly collectable Apple pattern (1940) and Desert Rose (1941).

'You've come a long way, Baby' would be an understatement for the company whose beginnings in 1875, produced sewer tile for the expanding American West.  The company expanded through the 1930's with production of roof tiles, garden pottery, art pottery and informal dinnerware.

Franciscan Desert Rose and Franciscan Apple are the only continuously produced Franciscan patterns that remain in production today.  Desert Rose has become the most sold American Dinnerware of all time.

Collecting Desert Rose today can be a challenge.  The original 1941 pieces are hard to find and pricey.  Over the decades, the production of this pattern has moved from California to England to China where it is today part of 'Wedgewood Waterford Royal Doulton' - The Luxury Lifestyle Group.   

My Desert Rose Collection consists of  place settings for four with accessory pieces of sugar and creamer, serving bowls, a pitcher and a rare egg cup.  I was lucky, an estate sale of the original 1941 edition made my day and completed my Desert Rose Collection.



1941 Desert Rose by Franciscan Pottery written in support of the
1940 US Census Community Project

Upon it's release, the 1940 Census Community Project, a joint initiative between Archives.com, Family Search, findmypast.com and other leading genealogy organizations, will coordinate efforts to provide quick access to these digital images and immediately start indexing these records to make them searchable online with free and open access.
You, too, can support the 1940 US Census Community Project
by volunteering as a 1940 US Census Indexer.
the1940census.com
Click on Badge and Get Started Today!

Linking to

3/22/12

1944 Handmade Handbags

Collectin' The 1940's

In 1944 Fashion designers knew that the influence of Glitzy Hollywood Stars draped in Furs and Diamonds was over. The days of 'Fur and Jeweled Accessories' was no longer appropriate, and to be seen carrying an expensive bag said volumes about one's support of the War Effort. 

Leather and metal were on the list of products for Military use only.  Materials for clothing and accessories had to utilize sturdier fabrics, such as tweeds, canvas and natural materials such as straw and gimp.  Wood and plastic replaced metal giving rise to  'Make Do and Mend'.

Ever resilent, women of the 1940's who not only 'Made Do and Mended',  reinvented their Pioneer Ancestors Spirit of  'It's Handmade, Honey'.   Home dressmakers, knitters, crocheters and other needle crafters took to their sewing machines and needles and Women's Magazines for patterns and inspiration.

From my Collection of Vintage Pattern Magazines comes the Jack Frost Instruction Booklet of Crocheted Handbags.  This company also produced pattern booklets for knitting with patterns just for men's sweaters, or just for women's sweaters, and just for children's sweaters.  The Handbag booklet cost 20 cents in 1940 and included 20 pages of stylish, glamourous models and patterns for handbags made from materials available to the Handcrafter in 1944.  I added it to my collection in 2004 for $2.75.  As collectors items on ebay, they range from $3.99 to $25.00 in todays market.


As Collectables, these Booklets are sought after as much for the Fashion Trends in clothing, hats and bags as for the patterns.  Even more collectable are the Glamour Photographs of the models showing hairstyles, makeup trends and stylish clothing and accessories. 

I'm thinking it is time to bring back the 1940's Easter Fashion Parade and
Crochet 'Straw Bag No. 4807'.
Instead of Jack Frost Straw which came in 2 oz. tubes in 1940, 
I'm going to use a Cotton Yarn and a larger crochet hook.

[click on pattern to enlarge]

1944 Handmade Handbags written in support of the
1940 US Census Community Project

Upon it's release, the 1940 Census Community Project, a joint initiative between Archives.com, Family Search, findmypast.com and other leading genealogy organizations, will coordinate efforts to provide quick access to these digital images and immediately start indexing these records to make them searchable online with free and open access.
You, too, can support the 1940 US Census Community Project
by volunteering as a 1940 US Census Indexer.
the1940census.com
Click on Badge and Get Started Today!

3/20/12

1943 Stenographer Says "Practice Makes Perfect"

Practice Makes Perfect
In 1943, Thelma Klemish was a Senior at Exira High School in Exira, Iowa. 
 "Practice Makes Perfect, Thelma"
She heard those words from her Commericial Instructor,  Mrs. Robert P. Shirley.
She heard those words from her Basketball Coach, Mr. Robert P. Shirley. 
AhHa!  A 'Practice Makes Perfect' Consipiracy!

I asked Thelma about that 'Consipiracy Theory' and if it was the beginning of her lifelong use of the words, 'Practice Makes Perfect'. You see, I've heard those words of wisdom from her my entire life.

She said, "At the time, I was sure they were in cahoots. Practice was boring and I always thought of myself as a Game Player. If I heard, "Thelma, use the backboard", once I heard it a million times. My Steno Pad was a collection of Big Red X's and O's and notes from Mrs. Shirley...'practice, practice, practice, Thelma'.

I took Shorthand for the first time as a Junior in 1942 and earned a certificate for 60 words a minute. Mrs. Shirley congratulated me in one breath and in the next said I could do better..."You know Thelma, 'Practice Makes Perfect". I heard the same thing from Coach Shirley when he handed me my Letter Award for basketball.

By the end of my Senior Year "Practice Makes Perfect" made 'Perfect Sense". With 'Practice', my Shorthand Speed increased to 80 words a minute and 'The Backboard' became my favorite scoring shot! I'll always remember Coach Shirley's words when he handed me my Team Captain Certificate, Thelma, you are a Perfect example of Perfect Practice Makes for Perfect Games
And Now....It's time to put 'Practice Makes Perfect' to good use with the announcement of...
The 1940 US Census Community Project Weekly Contest
'Getting Prepared To Index'
Click HERE for Entry Information
There are PRIZES...Two Qualified Entrants will be chosen at random to receive a
$50 Visa Gift Card and One Qualified Entrant a $100 Visa Gift Card.
The Contest is Sponsored by
the1940census.com
Click on Badge for The 1940 US Census Website
You, too, can support the 1940 US Census Community Project
by volunteering as a 1940 US Census Indexer.
Upon it's release on April 2nd, the 1940 Census Community Project, a joint initiative between Archives.com, Family Search, findmypast.com and other leading genealogy organizations, will coordinate efforts to provide quick access to these digital images and immediately start indexing these records to make them searchable online with free and open access.

As part of the 1940 US Census Blog Ambassador Program
'1943 Stenographer Says "Practice Makes Perfect"
Blog Post enters me...CollectInTexas Gal...into a drawing for a
KINDLE FIRE.

PS...About Thelma, the 1943 Stenographer...in February she celebrated her 85th Birthday.  Her lifelong BFF...Best Friend Forever...from Exira High School's Graduating Class of 1943 was her Guest of Honor. 

Throughout their lives, 'Practice Makes Perfect' has made 'Perfect Sense'.  They have been 'Role Models' for their children, grand children and great grand children who continue to Practice...'Practice Makes Perfect".

Coach and Mrs. Robert P. Shirley will be one of the 'First Folks' I will look for in the 1940 US Census.

PPS...Thanks to Thelma and her being a part of the 'The Greatest Generation', my post 'Ring-A-Ding-A-Ling...1947 Mobile Phone Calling' was selected as one of the Four Winning Entrants in last weeks 'Weekly Ambassadors Contest'. 
Thanks Mom,

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